Orientation, Ethnicity, And The Politics Of The United States

1882 Words Apr 10th, 2016 null Page
Orientation
Identification: The terms “Hispanic” and “Latina/o” are normally interchangeable, even though most governmental and scholarly documents have a preference for the use of “Hispanic”, while religious affiliations and grassroots incline to the latter one[ Suzanne Oboler, Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995), 3.]. In the past decades, those terms have come into general use in the United States to refer to all the people whose ancestry is predominantly from one or more Spanish-speaking areas, including most of the countries of South America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico[ Suzanne Oboler, Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995), 1.]. However, since this ethnic label Hispanic, or Latina/o homogenizes the varied social and political experiences of more than 23 millions people of different races, classes, languages, national origins, genders, and religions, the uses of this term have become the subject of confusion and debate in the social sciences, government agencies, and much of the society at large[ Suzanne Oboler, Ethnic Labels, Latino Lives: Identity and the Politics of (Re)Presentation in the United States (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995), 3.
]. Nevertheless, this term should be able to take the advantage of deep-rooted tradition in…

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